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Buying the Best CNC Mill Machine: Cost Considerations

Milling machines are at the heart of most woodworking operations. Used to produce wood stock for tables, countertops, and other products, milling precedes the refined processes that we think of as “woodwork.” Consequently, it is often completed in an expedited manner – a scenario for which computer numerical controlled (CNC) milling machines are ideal. A CNC mill differs from a standard milling machine in a major way: it is computer controlled and not manually controlled. If you machine wood at a high rate, this style of control can reduce waste work as it expedites the work process.

Increased Revenue vs. Cost of Purchase

Implementing a CNC mill machine could increase revenue – a fact that most woodworkers counterbalance with a mill’s cost of purchase. Increased revenue is realized in three ways: reduction of waste work, elimination of extensive machine prepping between production runs, and the ability to increase production rate. Normally, the value of these avenues for increased revenue is proportionate to production demand, which determines the size of machine that you need. Although an industrial grade CNC miller could be a six-figure investment, you shouldn’t run from that investment if your revenue potential justifies it.

With that said, there are ways to mitigate the high cost of CNC equipment, the most effective of which is to buy CNC machinery used. To some woodworkers, the thought of used machinery seems contrary to the benefits that every woodworker wants in a machine: reliability and accuracy. In the case of used hobby grade and medium grade CNC equipment, this concern is legitimate. But in the case of industrial grade equipment, which is designed to last for decades, this concern should be alleviated, especially when you take the following steps when buying a used woodworking machine:

• Buy from a professional seller of used woodworking equipment.
• Inspect a seller’s reputation at the Better Business Bureau (BBB).
• Only buy a machine that has a spotless maintenance record.
• Inspect a machine firsthand before buying it.

With used machines that offer top performance for years to come available, buying used can be like buying new. The difference, of course, is that you pay less for what you get.

Buying What You Need

If your operation is steadily growing, your focus will naturally be on the future. But don’t invest in machinery that your production rate isn’t close to justifying. One of the top reasons for repossessed woodworking machinery is the purchase of machines whose cost isn’t supported by the purchaser’s income. Upgrading your machinery gradually may sound meddlesome, but it could keep you solvent if something doesn’t go as planned.

RT Machine has the Machinery You Need

RT Machine specializes in the sale of new and used woodworking machinery. For over a decade, we have met the needs of small woodshops and large factories with new and pre-owned equipment that can’t be beat. If we don’t have what you need in stock, we will locate it at another seller and have it shipped to your location. Call us today.

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